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Nicholas Nguyen
Nicholas Nguyen

Jawset TurbulenceFD V1.0 Build 1437 R20 Win: The Ultimate Plugin for Volumetric Rendering in Cinema 4D


Jawset TurbulenceFD V1.0 Build 1437 R20 Win: A Review




If you are a Cinema 4D user who wants to create realistic smoke and fire simulations, you might have heard of Jawset TurbulenceFD. This plugin is one of the most popular tools for creating volumetric effects in Cinema 4D, and it has been used by many professionals and hobbyists alike. But what exactly is TurbulenceFD, and why do you need it? In this article, we will review the features, benefits, drawbacks, pricing, and availability of Jawset TurbulenceFD V1.0 Build 1437 R20 Win, the latest version of the plugin that is compatible with Cinema 4D R20 and later versions on Windows. We will also show you how to use TurbulenceFD to create stunning simulations in Cinema 4D, and give you some tips and tricks for better results. By the end of this article, you will have a clear idea of whether TurbulenceFD is the right plugin for you, and how to get started with it.




Jawset TurbulenceFD V1.0 Build 1437 R20 Win



Features of TurbulenceFD




TurbulenceFD is a plugin that extends the functionality of Cinema 4D by adding a new object type called Fluid Container. This object allows you to create a voxel grid that defines the domain of your simulation. Within this domain, you can add one or more emitters that inject fluid into the grid. The fluid can be either smoke or fire, or a combination of both. The plugin then simulates the motion and behavior of the fluid based on physical laws and parameters that you can control. The result is a realistic and dynamic simulation of smoke and fire that you can render with Cinema 4D's native renderer or any third-party renderer that supports volumetrics.


But what makes TurbulenceFD stand out from other plugins or software that can create similar effects? Here are some of the main features of TurbulenceFD that make it unique and powerful:


Voxel-based solver based on the incompressible Navier Stokes equations




TurbulenceFD's simulation pipeline implements a voxel-based solver based on the incompressible Navier Stokes equations. That means it uses a voxel grid to describe the volumetric clouds of smoke and fire and solves the equations that describe the motion of fluid on that grid. This approach allows TurbulenceFD to capture the complex details and turbulence of fluid dynamics, such as vortices, swirls, shocks, waves, etc. It also ensures that the simulation is physically accurate and conserves mass, momentum, and energy.


Multiple channels to describe properties like temperature, smoke density 3>Support for RealFlow rigid and elastoc particle emitters




TurbulenceFD also supports RealFlow, a standalone software for creating fluid and soft body simulations. You can use RealFlow to create rigid and elastic particle emitters that interact with TurbulenceFD's fluid container. For example, you can create a simulation of a burning car, a rocket launch, or a water splash. You can import the RealFlow particle data into Cinema 4D using the RealFlow Cinema 4D plugin, and then use TurbulenceFD to add smoke and fire effects to the particles. You can also use TurbulenceFD's channels to control the emission of fluid from the particles, such as the temperature, fuel, and smoke density.


How to use TurbulenceFD




Now that you know what TurbulenceFD can do, let's see how to use it in Cinema 4D. In this section, we will guide you through the basic steps of creating a simple smoke simulation using TurbulenceFD. We will assume that you have already installed and activated the plugin on your Cinema 4D R20 or later version on Windows. If you need help with the installation and activation process, you can refer to the official documentation.


Installation and activation




To install TurbulenceFD, you need to download the installer from the Jawset website. You can choose between a full installer or an update installer, depending on whether you have a previous version of the plugin or not. The installer will copy the plugin files to your Cinema 4D plugins folder. You can also manually copy the plugin files to any folder and add it to your Cinema 4D preferences.


To activate TurbulenceFD, you need to request a license key from the Jawset website. You can choose between a node-locked license or a floating license, depending on your needs. A node-locked license is tied to a specific computer, while a floating license can be used on any computer that is connected to a license server. You can also request a free trial license that is valid for 30 days. Once you have your license key, you need to enter it in the TurbulenceFD preferences dialog in Cinema 4D. You can access this dialog by clicking on the TurbulenceFD menu in Cinema 4D and selecting Preferences.


Setting up the scene and the emitter




To create a smoke simulation using TurbulenceFD, you need to set up two main elements: a fluid container and an emitter. The fluid container defines the domain of your simulation, while the emitter injects smoke into the container.


To create a fluid container, go to the TurbulenceFD menu in Cinema 4D and select Create Container. This will create a new object called TFD Container in your scene. You can adjust the size and position of the container using the standard Cinema 4D tools. You can also change the resolution of the container using the Voxels parameter in the Object tab of the container's attributes. The higher the resolution, the more detail and accuracy you will get in your simulation, but also the more memory and disk space you will need.


To create an emitter, you can use any object that has geometry or particles in Cinema 4D. For example, you can use a sphere, a cube, a spline, a cloner, an emitter, etc. You can also use multiple emitters in your scene if you want. To make an object an emitter for TurbulenceFD, you need to add a TFD Emitter tag to it. You can do this by selecting the object and going to the TurbulenceFD menu and selecting Add Emitter Tag. This will add a new tag called TFD Emitter to your object. You can adjust the settings of the emitter using the parameters in the tag's attributes. For example, you can change the temperature, fuel, and smoke values of the emitter, the emission mode, the emission shape, the emission direction, etc.


Adjusting the simulation parameters and caching




Once you have set up your fluid container and your emitter, you can adjust the simulation parameters to control how the fluid behaves and interacts with the environment. You can access the simulation parameters by selecting the fluid container and going to the Simulation tab of its attributes. Here you can find various settings that affect the fluid dynamics, such as the buoyancy, cooling, diffusion, dissipation, vorticity, gravity, wind, etc. You can also add forces and collisions to your simulation using Cinema 4D's native tools, such as attractors, deflectors, fields, etc. TurbulenceFD will automatically detect and apply these forces and collisions to the fluid.


To run the simulation, you need to cache the data to disk. Caching is the process of saving the simulation data for each frame to a file on your hard drive. This allows you to play back and render your simulation without having to recalculate it every time. To cache your simulation, you need to select the fluid container and go to the Cache tab of its attributes. Here you can find settings that affect the caching process, such as the cache folder, the cache format, the cache compression, etc. You can also choose whether to cache all channels or only some of them. To start caching, you need to click on the Start button at the bottom of the tab. You can see the progress of the caching in the status bar of Cinema 4D. You can also pause, resume, or stop the caching at any time.


Rendering the simulation with materials and lights




After you have cached your simulation, you can render it with Cinema 4D's native renderer or any third-party renderer that supports volumetrics. To render your simulation, you need to add a material and a light to your scene. You can use any material or light that you want, but TurbulenceFD also provides some presets that are optimized for volumetric rendering.


To add a material to your simulation, you need to create a new material in Cinema 4D and apply it to your fluid container. You can use any shader or texture that you want in your material, but TurbulenceFD also provides some shaders that are designed for volumetric rendering. These shaders are called TFD Gradient Shader and TFD Channel Shader. You can find them in the Material Manager under TurbulenceFD. The TFD Gradient Shader allows you to map a gradient to any channel of your simulation, such as temperature, smoke density, fuel, etc. The TFD Channel Shader allows you to access any channel of your simulation as a grayscale value. You can use these shaders in any channel of your material, such as color, luminance, transparency, etc.


To add a light to your scene, you can use any light that you want, but TurbulenceFD also provides some presets that are optimized for volumetric rendering. These presets are called TFD Area Light and TFD Spot Light. You can find them in the Object Manager under TurbulenceFD. The TFD Area Light is a rectangular area light that emits light from one side only. The TFD Spot Light is a cone-shaped spot light that emits light from one point only. Both lights have settings that affect how they illuminate and cast shadows on the fluid.


Tips and tricks for better results




Now that you know how to use TurbulenceFD in Cinema 4D, here are some tips and tricks that can help you achieve better results:


  • Use a high resolution for your fluid container if you want more detail and accuracy in your simulation. However, keep in mind that this will also increase the memory and disk usage and the simulation time.



  • Use multiple emitters with different settings if you want more variety and complexity in your simulation. For example, you can use one emitter for smoke and another one for fire.



  • Use forces and collisions to add more motion and interaction to your fluid. For example , you can use an attractor to create a vortex effect, or a deflector to create a collision with a solid object.



  • Use the TFD Gradient Shader and the TFD Channel Shader to create custom materials and shaders for your fluid. For example, you can use the temperature channel to create a gradient from yellow to red for the fire, or use the smoke density channel to create a gradient from black to white for the smoke.



  • Use multiple lights with different colors and intensities to create more realistic and dramatic lighting for your fluid. For example, you can use a warm light for the fire and a cool light for the smoke.



  • Use global illumination, ambient occlusion, depth of field, motion blur, etc. to enhance the realism and quality of your rendering. However, keep in mind that these effects will also increase the rendering time.



Pros and cons of TurbulenceFD




TurbulenceFD is a powerful and easy-to-use plugin for creating smoke and fire simulations in Cinema 4D. However, like any software, it also has its pros and cons. Here are some of the advantages and disadvantages of using TurbulenceFD:


Pros: High-quality simulations, easy to use, flexible, compatible with Cinema 4D features




TurbulenceFD offers high-quality simulations that are realistic, dynamic, and detailed. The plugin uses a voxel-based solver based on the incompressible Navier Stokes equations, which captures the complex turbulence and behavior of fluid dynamics. The plugin also uses multiple channels to describe the properties of the fluid, such as temperature, smoke density, fuel, etc., which allows you to create custom materials and shaders for rendering.


TurbulenceFD is also easy to use and intuitive. The plugin integrates seamlessly with Cinema 4D's interface and workflow. You can create a fluid container and an emitter with just a few clicks, and adjust the simulation parameters with simple sliders and checkboxes. You can also preview your simulation in real time in the viewport with OpenGL rendering.


TurbulenceFD is also flexible and versatile. The plugin allows you to create various types of smoke and fire effects, such as explosions, flames, plumes, trails, etc. You can also use multiple emitters with different settings to create more complex and varied simulations. You can also use forces and collisions to add more motion and interaction to your fluid.


TurbulenceFD is also compatible with Cinema 4D's features and tools. The plugin supports Cinema 4D's native renderer and any third-party renderer that supports volumetrics. The plugin also supports RealFlow particle emitters, which allows you to create hybrid simulations of fluid and particles. The plugin also supports Cinema 4D's native forces and collisions, which allows you to integrate your simulation with other objects in your scene.


Cons: High memory and disk usage, long simulation times, limited documentation and support




TurbulenceFD also has some drawbacks that you should be aware of before using it. One of the main drawbacks is the high memory and disk usage that the plugin requires. The plugin uses a voxel grid to store the simulation data, which can consume a lot of RAM and disk space depending on the resolution of the grid. For example, a 256x256x256 grid can use up to 1 GB of RAM and disk space per channel per frame. If you have multiple channels or frames in your simulation, you can easily run out of memory or disk space.


Another drawback is the long simulation times that the plugin can take. The plugin uses a solver that calculates the motion of fluid on each voxel in each frame, which can be very time-consuming depending on the complexity of your simulation. For example, a simple smoke simulation can take several minutes or hours to cache, while a complex fire simulation can take several hours or days to cache. If you want to make changes or adjustments to your simulation parameters, you may have to recache your simulation from scratch.


A final drawback is the limited documentation and support that the plugin provides. The plugin comes with a user manual that explains the basic functions and settings of the plugin, but it does not cover all the features or scenarios that you may encounter when using it. The plugin also has a forum where you can ask questions or share your work with other users, but it does not have an official support team or service that you can contact if you have any issues or problems with the plugin.


Pricing and availability of TurbulenceFD




If you are interested in using TurbulenceFD for your projects, you need to know how much it costs and where you can get it. Here are some details about the pricing and availability of TurbulenceFD:


Pricing: Different licenses for different needs [user](#message , free trial available




TurbulenceFD offers different licenses for different needs and budgets. You can choose between a node-locked license or a floating license, depending on whether you want to use the plugin on a specific computer or on any computer that is connected to a license server. A node-locked license costs 499 EUR, while a floating license costs 699 EUR. You can also buy multiple licenses at a discounted price if you need them. You can pay for your license using PayPal or credit card.


If you are not sure whether you want to buy a license or not, you can also request a free trial license that is valid for 30 days. A trial license allows you to use all the features and functions of the plugin, but it adds a watermark to your rendering and limits the resolution of your simulation to 128x128x128 voxels. You can request a trial license from the Jawset website.


Availability: Compatible with Cinema 4D R20 and later versions, Windows only




TurbulenceFD is compatible with Cinema 4D R20 and later versions, including R21, S22, R23, and S24. However, it is only available for Windows operating systems, such as Windows 7, 8, 10, etc. There is no Mac version of the plugin at the moment. You can download the installer for TurbulenceFD from the Jawset website.


Conclusion and recommendations




TurbulenceFD is a plugin for Cinema 4D that allows you to create realistic smoke and fire simulations with ease and flexibility. The plugin uses a voxel-based solver based on the incompressible Navier Stokes equations to capture the complex turbulence and behavior of fluid dynamics. The plugin also uses multiple channels to describe the properties of the fluid, such as temperature, smoke density, fuel, etc., which allows you to create custom materials and shaders for rendering. The plugin also supports GPU acceleration for faster simulations and rendering, and RealFlow particle emitters for hybrid simulations of fluid and particles.


TurbulenceFD is a powerful and easy-to-use plugin that can enhance your projects and workflows in Cinema 4D. However, it also has some drawbacks that you should be aware of before using it. The plugin requires high memory and disk usage, which can limit your simulation resolution and duration. The plugin also takes long simulation times, which can slow down your iteration process. The plugin also has limited documentation and support, which can make it difficult to learn and troubleshoot.


If you are interested in using TurbulenceFD for your projects, we recommend that you try it out first with a free trial license that is valid for 30 days. This will allow you to test the features and functions of the plugin and see if it meets your needs and expectations. If you decide to buy a license, you can choose between a node-locked license or a floating license, depending on your preferences and budget. You can also buy multiple licenses at a discounted price if you need them.


We hope that this article has given you a comprehensive overview of Jawset TurbulenceFD V1.0 Build 1437 R20 Win, a plugin for Cinema 4D that allows you to create realistic smoke and fire simulations. We hope that this article has helped you understand what TurbulenceFD can do, how to use it, what are its pros and cons, how much it costs, and where you can get it. We hope that this article has inspired you to create stunning simulations with TurbulenceFD in Cinema 4D.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about TurbulenceFD:


Q: What are the system requirements for TurbulenceFD?




A: TurbulenceFD requires Cinema 4D R20 or later versions on Windows operating systems. It also requires a graphics card that supports OpenCL 1.2 or later versions for GPU acceleration.


Q: How can I learn more about TurbulenceFD?




A: You can learn more about TurbulenceFD by reading the user manual that comes with the plugin, visiting the official website and forum of Jawset, watching tutorial videos on YouTube or other platforms, or joining online communities of Cinema 4D users.


Q: How can I get help or support for TurbulenceFD?




A: You can get help or support for TurbulenceFD by posting your questions or issues on the official forum of Jawset, contacting Jawset via email or social media, or asking other users who have experience with TurbulenceFD.


Q: How can I update TurbulenceFD?




A: You can update TurbulenceFD by downloading the latest installer from the Jawset website and running it on your computer. The installer will automatically detect and update your existing version of the plugin. You can also check for updates from within Cinema 4D by clicking on the TurbulenceFD menu and selecting Check for Updates.


Q: How can I share my work or feedback with Jawset?




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